I currently live in California, but it’s literally impossible to afford to buy a house.

Where are some good places to move to? I was thinking about Washington State, but I’m not sure I could handle the snow.

  • tkohldesac@lemmy.world
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    4 months ago

    I’ve lived in Washington State (western) for 4 years total and have seen exactly 10 days of snow the entire time I’ve been here. Houses are still 3-400k. I want to move either closer to SeaTac or down to Vancouver because I bought a house in an area with a lot of flags on trucks if you catch my drift. We have more cloudy days than anything. We get lots of rain but it’s mostly just clouds and drizzles.

    • classic@fedia.io
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      4 months ago

      That’s my ideal weather. But, yeah, I need to be near a metro area to be happy

      • tkohldesac@lemmy.world
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        4 months ago

        I’d personally recommend Vancouver then. Lived there in an apartment for a year and it was a nice mix of urban, suburban and rural. Basically drive 15 minutes in any direction and you’re in a new biome. Personally looking to move back there once I get a new job and sell the house.

        • classic@fedia.io
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          4 months ago

          I’ve just assumed I’d be priced out of, well anything, there. But I’ve certainly considered it. Haven’t been there in quite a long time though. I should visit there again

  • janNatan@lemmy.ml
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    4 months ago

    Tennessee still has some affordable housing in rural areas. Very little snow as well.

    Are you prepared for no-flouride water, septic tanks, an awful education system, a sub-tropical climate that seems to get less “sub” every year, more types of pollen than you’ve ever dreamed of, more guns than people, and rampant meth/opioid abuse?

    • Dharma Curious@startrek.website
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      4 months ago

      Don’t forget the discrimination and frequent unreported assaults on queer folks and people of color!

      Tennessee: The volunteer (to give up any reasonable expectation at a decent quality of life) state!

  • surewhynotlem@lemmy.world
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    4 months ago

    Raleigh/Durham in NC. it’s a little bubble of progressive in a red state. Houses aren’t crazy yet. Lots of tech work. No snow.

    • billwashere@lemmy.world
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      4 months ago

      Been in this area for almost 35 years. Had to move further south (Johnston Co… like 30 min from downtown Raleigh) to find a house we could afford. Lived in Cary in a townhouse that more than doubled in rent in 10 years.

      Can confirm there are quite a few IT jobs. Been in IT since mid 90s.

      All in all would recommend this area.

    • edric@lemm.ee
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      4 months ago

      Same as Austin, but housing is not really affordable right now, unless you’re willing to live out in the burbs.

  • mosiacmango@lemm.ee
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    4 months ago

    “No snow” and “Affordable housing” are going to be a tricky combo.

    Eastern Washington gets lots of snow and is basically Idaho, but houses are around 3-400k. Western Washington doesnt tend to get much snow, but it does happen, and housing is averaging around 600k for a 2bd/2ba even out in more suburban areas, so not exactly affordable. Big cities think more like 750-850k.

    Im also assuming you’re looking for West coast vibes given the Cali to Washington idea. New Mexico/Arizona/Nevada might match what youre looking for.

  • Floufym@lemmy.world
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    4 months ago

    I would recommend somewhere in Europe. You will have paid vacation and heathcare insurance and (almost) free school and … :)

    • AlecSadler@sh.itjust.works
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      4 months ago

      I’ve looked into relocating there, but citizenship seems difficult?

      I also think I read somewhere that there are stricter labor laws so I wouldn’t be able to freelance as heavily (~30 hours a week) alongside having full-time employment?

    • TimewornTraveler@lemm.ee
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      4 months ago

      WE AREN’T INVITED

      It’s so frustrating hearing Europeans tell Americans to move there. As if we could just up and run and get visas and jobs. Trust me, if it were easy, I would have done it. I’ve moved across the pale blue dot multiple times and never found an avenue into the EU.

      Do you have any idea how difficult immigration is? Maybe you’ve been listening to the Islamaphobes too much… another great reason not to move to Europe btw, what if you’re the wrong color… they have a very different brand of bigotry out there

      • ECB@feddit.de
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        4 months ago

        It depends on the person, but some countries like Austria have points-based systems that will work for some people. It’s how I’m getting a visa currently and I just needed a job offer.

        Or you can go hard-mode and take the Svalbard route!

  • Jakdracula@lemmy.world
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    4 months ago

    A friend of mine just moved to California. San Diego. Couldn’t afford a house so he bought a boat and he now lives on the boat. He said the boat is much better than any house. It’s much larger than any house he could maybe afford there and if he doesn’t like San Diego, he could just float away to somewhere else.

  • jordanlund@lemmy.world
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    4 months ago

    Are you working remotely or would you depend on the local economy for a job?

    Because the big catch is, the places you can afford have no work.

    Or even with remote work, you need broadband access, so no DSL, no Hughesnet.

  • Drusas@kbin.run
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    4 months ago

    Western Washington doesn’t get a lot of snow unless you’re in the mountains.

  • OneCardboardBox@lemmy.sdf.org
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    4 months ago

    Consider SW Michigan. 2h drive/train to Chicago, proximity to large bodies of water for summer enjoyment, and if you live in a reasonably-sized town they’re probably good at clearing roads when it snows.

    Besides, our winters get milder each year. There’s a couple of big snow/ice events, but the trick is to not be on the road while the heavy stuff is coming down. Wait a few hours for it to ease up and for the snow plows to do their thing.

  • june@lemmy.world
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    4 months ago

    Snow? Realllllyyyy depends on where in the state

    Western Washington gets almost none, and you’ve got the whole I5 corridor to move to. Vancouver is the biggest city with the most affordable housing ratio. Not that it’s an oddly deep red district which is counter intuitive considering its size and proximity to Portland.

    Bellingham up near the border is next in line, but it’s smaller and further from city activities.

    Tacoma and Olympia are both cities that Seattleites are starting to move to despite the commute due to more affordable housing.

    Then there’s Everett, the home of Boeing and about 25 miles north of Seattle. Cheaper than Seattle and has reasonable access to Seattle or to head north to the border. Still expect to pay 600k plus for a house though.

    Lastly there’s everything between. It’s all small towns, rural areas, trees, and hills. The spot about smack dab between Tacoma and Portland gets more snow than most of the west side of the state, so maybe not for you. But the rest is good. And these places will all be cheap as hell to buy in. You just won’t have city amenities.

  • AmosBurton@lemmy.world
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    4 months ago

    I say move to Philadelphia, buy a bar with a couple friends and reconnect with your rich dad.

    The rest will happen organically…

  • AmidFuror@fedia.io
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    4 months ago

    Just live where other people don’t want to live. Living in desirable places drives the prices up.

  • TimewornTraveler@lemm.ee
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    4 months ago

    You want less snow than Seattle??

    Nowhere can you buy an affordable house, unless you move out to middle of nowhere. I’ve heard they’re still affordable in Appalachia

    • FollyDolly@lemmy.world
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      4 months ago

      I live in appalachia, come on in! Cheap real estate and beautiful scenery. Seen houses in my small town for 40,000$. Jobs that pay well can be hard to find, but if you don’t mind traveling, or can work from home I’d recommend it.

    • HelixDab2@lemm.ee
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      4 months ago

      Fuck off! We don’t want more people here! And the affordable houses have been abandoned for a decade and are just foundations without any copper wiring or pipes.

  • Head@lemmings.world
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    4 months ago

    So many comments suggesting American cities… I would rather suggest humbling yourself to the point where you can beg for EU citizenship. There’s no point in the US anymore.

    • vivavideri@lemmy.world
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      4 months ago

      Do you know how hard it is to actually get citizenship outside of usa? If you don’t work in a field that a country wants the website essentially says lol no (Ireland/Canada). They’d also quarantine the shit out of pets and traumatizing fluffy isn’t really top of the list.

      • Head@lemmings.world
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        4 months ago

        I got German citizenship. Took starting over and doing a degree in the country for it to be possible. I also brought fluffy and we did a rabies antibody test and some other things so they didn’t need quarantine.

        Edit: This is why I said you need to humble yourself. Maybe that was a poor choice of wording, but the US is a sinking ship and I’d sell all my belongings again if things start looking that dire here too.

        • the_third@feddit.de
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          4 months ago

          Well, Germany is on that track, I’d say, with the Nazis on the rise and the general opposition to just about any kind of change at every level of daily life, absolute digital incompetence and a bureaucratic apparatus that mainly works for keeping itself alive.

      • NeoNachtwaechter@lemmy.world
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        4 months ago

        LMAO

        But look a little closer: OP hasn’t mentioned outside of Usa. He hasn’t even mentioned that he’s inside. That means, it is much better for the world and for him if he stays there.

      • systemglitch@lemmy.world
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        4 months ago

        Living in Canada I can assure you they let in hundreds of thousands of uneducated low wage workers each year. You just have to live in Africa first.